Crypto adoption has no future without regulation and law enforcement

Crypto adoption has no future without regulation and law enforcement

The basis of any exchange of value is trust. The more two parties trust each other, the more they will feel confident engaging in transactions. Not just engaging in a high volume of transactions, but higher value transactions, too.

Bitcoin (BTC) and other cryptocurrencies are certainly accomplishing a lot when it comes to creating a decentralized environment where the ability to trust another party is taken out of the equation by a blockchain. Hardcore enthusiasts who already understand this are the ones most willing to reach into their coffers and pour money into the crypto revolution. The truth is, though, that the average consumer still isn’t at that point yet.

Some libertarians probably don’t want to hear this, but in order for the crypto world to reach critical mass, it needs much broader adoption, and the average consumer is going to need another layer of protection in place. They need a set of rules and somebody to complain when things go awry.

Related: Why we need evolutionary, not revolutionary, regulatory initiatives

Blockchain technology certainly does an amazing job of allowing participants to exchange value in a trustless environment. If you don’t share your private keys, nobody can steal your value. Teaching this to newly minted crypto holders is fundamental to getting them to buy in.

While many view that next step as a hindrance to adoption, regulation in the crypto space will most certainly accelerate it. The more layers we add to the safety net for consumers, the more confident new investors and adopters will be in getting involved.

The Bank Secrecy Act took effect in the 1970s and stands as the first piece of significant legislation in the United States surrounding Anti-Money Laundering and terrorist financing. It essentially forces banks to cooperate with the U.S. government in fighting financial crime. Following the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in September of 2001, the Patriot Act was born, further opening up the lines of communication between banks and governments in the same vein.

Fast-forward to 2019, an international governing body called the Financial Action Task Force extends the travel rule to include not just banks but virtual assets and exchanges. The rule stipulates that virtual asset service providers must share the identities of users trading assets worth $1,000 or more.

Related: FATF AML regulation: Can the crypto industry adapt to the travel rule?

Tracking and providing that information sounds pretty straightforward, and it should be that way. But it also means virtual asset service providers need to fulfill all kinds of other tasks in order to become compliant, including:

  • Establishing what a typical crypto transaction looks like so that they can spot abnormal patterns signifying potential criminal activity.
  • Screening customer wallets regularly.
  • Sharing a list of potentially blacklisted customers with other virtual asset providers and authorities.
  • Sharing Know Your Customer information with virtual asset providers and authorities.
  • The inherent challenges with the FATF travel rule are certainly very real ones. For one, it requires buy-in from many virtual asset providers running blockchain projects and exchanges using different technologies. This makes tracking customer information at a granular level more difficult. That said, the benefit of the travel rule will outweigh those challenges. It stretches beyond the typical KYC procedures most crypto service providers follow. KYC relates mostly to an organization’s internal processes. The travel rule is much broader in nature. It pushes both virtual asset providers and governments to be transparent. It aims to go beyond the idea of individual nations subscribing to their own rules surrounding crypto.

    The Ontario Securities Commission in Canada recently ruled that cryptocurrency exchange BitMEX, which operates out of the Seychelles Islands, isn’t properly registered to serve residents of the province and thus has to cease accepting new registrations and trades from Ontarians.

    More of these kinds of rulings will continue to come out of the woodwork, forcing virtual asset service providers to either adjust and comply, or take on the risks associated with doing business under the radar. The former and not the latter is the better long-term proposition for both crypto businesses and investors alike.

    There are several tools — and more are coming — that aid regulators in continuing to develop better frameworks. They allow the average consumer to feel more comfortable with getting into cryptocurrency through any number of properly vetted on-ramps.

    Most avid crypto traders are familiar with blockchain explorers — either publicly available or advanced ones being developed by private companies — that aim to dig deeper into the origins of transactions. This gives law enforcement the technology needed to track stolen funds, money laundering and criminal purchases made with crypto. The action of law enforcement adds trust to the ecosystem, making it safer for broad adoption.

    Risk-scoring solutions are also being developed that allow market participants, including exchanges and individuals, to see whether counterparty wallets or proposed transactions carry risk. This knowledge will allow exchanges to steer clear of stolen funds, money laundering and bad actors. This again adds trust to the ecosystem.

    Just in the last few days, the Conference of State Bank Supervisors, a regulatory body representing all U.S. states and territories, has announced the launch of a new regulatory framework for payment companies, money service businesses and cryptocurrency companies. Only Montana, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico are not included in the launch.

    Related: How the US and Europe are regulating crypto in 2020

    This new framework requires major payment providers like Western Union, PayPal and 76 other money services and crypto-related businesses to undergo a thorough examination of their AML practices. Altogether, this new framework will regulate payment services that are responsible for transferring over $1 trillion in customer funds annually.

    Ultimately, this launch and the broader impact of the FATF travel rule will serve to hold both businesses and market participants accountable for tracking transaction data, engaging in proper KYC protocols, and serving crypto adopters both old and new with added layers of protection that make investing in cryptocurrencies a more welcoming proposition.

    Increased regulation and law enforcement is the path leading to exponential increases in the adoption of digital assets both now and in the future. And it is inevitably coming.

    The views, thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s alone and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions of Cointelegraph.

    Mark Binns is the CEO of BIGG Digital Assets Inc. BIGG believes the future of crypto is a safe, compliant and regulated environment. He first discovered crypto in 2013 and was hooked. He believes the future of crypto is a safe, compliant and regulated environment. As the CEO of BIGG Digital Assets, Mark oversees Blockchain Intelligence Group, the maker of QLUETM and BitRank, and Netcoins.

    Source: inula.org

    Author: About The Author

    admin


    Crypto crimes are no excuse for taking away digital asset fungibility

    Crypto crimes are no excuse for taking away digital asset fungibility

    The modern world has become too small for comfort. The truth is that technological advancement is a double-edged sword, which has the potential to enhance human lives drastically at many levels and disrupt them in the blink of an eye, shaping things on a global level to an extent yet not seen. 

    Even though we enjoy fast progress in crypto services and digital asset fields, constant security breaches and hacks pose a severe threat to market participants. The very essence of safety in the modern world is questioned. Therefore, it’s about time we clarify the complex topic of fungibility in the digital asset field.

    Everything is online nowadays. We’ve been focusing on the future so hard that we’ve failed to recognize the point of no return. Back in the 90s, the internet was something of a miracle, an arcane original development. Today, in the mobile-driven social media age, we can hardly imagine our existence without the need to interact or communicate with somebody every two minutes.

    Nowadays we see that Web 2.0. development is not only about benefits since many professionally organized criminal groups have generated an infamous wave of hacking attacks in the digital world. Mid-level companies are not the only ones faced with danger anymore — top brands are targeted by hackers to get millions in ransom, and even the most well-known crypto exchanges are affected. Media stars and politicians have also become victims of such unpleasant events, having experienced Twitter hacks earlier this summer, which proved to be a well-coordinated social-engineering attack.

    Related: Crypto Twitter hack recap: A ‘wake up call’ for centralized platforms

    Meanwhile, the emergence of cryptocurrencies and their slow but steady way to mainstream adoption has raised funds security questions. The advent of mobile internet resulted in the success of neo-banking among populations who previously weren’t able to get a checking account in euro or dollars — such as in emerging markets like Africa, India and South Asian countries. Cryptocurrency apps became of major significance as people trusted currencies that aren’t subject to harsh volatility. With the introduction of stablecoins, opening a checking account in euro, for example, became possible within a minute.

    Still, security and decentralization are topics that had been discussed long before cryptocurrencies became popular. This goal was set as one of the crypto revolution’s primary targets, but it is often misunderstood in the modern world.

    The technical process involved in crypto ecosystems’ functioning is tough to judge from the outside. But we can definitely be sure from a high-level perspective that when decentralized finance or permissionless finance faces an existing legal system, there is always room for some compromise. If legal authorities ask a particular platform to react, they either take some bureaucratic action or cease to exist because the court orders them to shut down their activities.

    This questions the fundamental ability of digital assets to be fungible. When a specific manipulation or theft happens, some of these assets become nonfungible. Since a centralized platform that has facilitated such trades has been unknowingly involved in helping thieves, it’s required to take action requested by law enforcement. It must then provide evidence in court that the team did everything it could to stop fraud.

    What happens next? A certain platform reaches out to another platform or centralized counterparty and blacklists the digital assets that were stolen. Other exchanges will start refusing to credit those digital assets to accounts, ultimately making them nonfungible. In the real world, money laundering is when the so-called “dirty money” is mixed with “clean money.” Everybody has touched bills that have been involved in some illicit trade at least once throughout their lives; since it’s effortless to mix cash, we can never reveal that it actually happened.

    With digital assets in place, it’s much easier to trace everything. The biggest fundamental question arises: At what level should we break that fungibility for digital assets and at what point? It takes some time for the authorities to release some action items, and counterparties have to prepare or do something in advance to make sure they are justified in court.

    The new age, indeed, brings more opportunities than problems. But is the evolution of crypto responsible for the increase in money laundering more than the traditional finance industry? I don’t think so. It’s important to realize that U.S. banknotes are still the most difficult to counterfeit in the world. And the recently leaked documents from the U.S. Financial Crimes Enforcement Network indicated that many banks “enable” money laundering with fiat currencies.

    Related: Comparing money laundering with cryptocurrencies and fiat

    Speaking about crypto, it’s inevitable that at the intersection of traditional markets and emerging ones, illicit actors would use any arising opportunity and illegal funds stolen from the traditional financial world to launder them. So far, such activity is not big enough in terms of relativity to digital instruments. It will grow; the number of cases will rise; and the crypto community will have to choose an effective approach to dealing with crypto transactions originated by bad actors.

    Still, money laundering schemes that fraudsters mostly use are related to good old classic fiat methods. Interestingly enough, the same goes for SWIFT fraud activities. Do we really have to worry about crypto money laundering when there are more unresolved problems in traditional financial channels?

    Numerous researches conducted in this area over the last few years prove that despite many institutions still see cryptocurrencies as an unregulated Wild West territory and that traditional banking institutions pose a much greater risk for money laundering activities. Moreover, it’s too early to talk about the severe danger coming from such activities in crypto. While not denying it, it’s worthwhile to acknowledge the rotten underbelly and shadow activity of many financial institutions.

    What’s the possible way out of this situation? The emergence of self-regulation solutions might be a possible answer. For example, when exchanges receive information that a certain hack has occurred, they can secretly blacklist the addresses and later ask the client for the source of funds or force the transfer owner to reveal the identity. If the owner acquired the funds dishonestly, the exchange would get a chance to use that information for users’ protection.

    The natural pace of progress will settle issues with illicit activities as self-regulation must sooner or later be developed, but it’s already necessary to put rigid barriers in place. The most straightforward approach will be government bodies that regulate the process of obtaining investors’ money to fulfill investment promises. This will significantly cut off the opportunities for further theft as it happened with initial coin offerings and Ponzi scheme projects that existed in a universe of their own.

    Moreover, it is also necessary to clean up under-leveraged loans and to regulate any venture that people can pour money into and lose it — not by incompetence or financial illiteracy, but by fraud activities committed by third parties.

    The state can really help by creating a comprehensive tool to analyze and prevent scam schemes and issue regulatory policies that complicate launching and operating such projects. Weapons trading policies are a great example; comprehensive and strict rules for purchasing and storing make access to such tools very complicated, but it works and helps to protect people’s lives.

    Fungibility is violated in the modern world — a consequence of globalization trends, increased internet penetration, and the intersection of real money with the crypto world, where users’ funds are unprotected.

    The views, thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s alone and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions of Cointelegraph.

    Gregory Klumov is a stablecoin expert whose insights and opinions appear regularly in numerous international publications. He is the founder and CEO of Stasis — a technology provider that issues the most widely used euro-backed stablecoins with a high transparency standard in the digital-asset industry.

    Source: inula.org

    Author: About The Author

    admin


    Crypto adoption has no future without regulation and law enforcement

    Crypto adoption has no future without regulation and law enforcement

    The basis of any exchange of value is trust. The more two parties trust each other, the more they will feel confident engaging in transactions. Not just engaging in a high volume of transactions, but higher value transactions, too.

    Bitcoin (BTC) and other cryptocurrencies are certainly accomplishing a lot when it comes to creating a decentralized environment where the ability to trust another party is taken out of the equation by a blockchain. Hardcore enthusiasts who already understand this are the ones most willing to reach into their coffers and pour money into the crypto revolution. The truth is, though, that the average consumer still isn’t at that point yet.

    Some libertarians probably don’t want to hear this, but in order for the crypto world to reach critical mass, it needs much broader adoption, and the average consumer is going to need another layer of protection in place. They need a set of rules and somebody to complain when things go awry.

    Related: Why we need evolutionary, not revolutionary, regulatory initiatives

    Blockchain technology certainly does an amazing job of allowing participants to exchange value in a trustless environment. If you don’t share your private keys, nobody can steal your value. Teaching this to newly minted crypto holders is fundamental to getting them to buy in.

    While many view that next step as a hindrance to adoption, regulation in the crypto space will most certainly accelerate it. The more layers we add to the safety net for consumers, the more confident new investors and adopters will be in getting involved.

    The Bank Secrecy Act took effect in the 1970s and stands as the first piece of significant legislation in the United States surrounding Anti-Money Laundering and terrorist financing. It essentially forces banks to cooperate with the U.S. government in fighting financial crime. Following the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in September of 2001, the Patriot Act was born, further opening up the lines of communication between banks and governments in the same vein.

    Fast-forward to 2019, an international governing body called the Financial Action Task Force extends the travel rule to include not just banks but virtual assets and exchanges. The rule stipulates that virtual asset service providers must share the identities of users trading assets worth $1,000 or more.

    What cryptocurrency will become the main one in a year?
    BitcoinEthereum

    Related: FATF AML regulation: Can the crypto industry adapt to the travel rule?

    Tracking and providing that information sounds pretty straightforward, and it should be that way. But it also means virtual asset service providers need to fulfill all kinds of other tasks in order to become compliant, including:

  • Establishing what a typical crypto transaction looks like so that they can spot abnormal patterns signifying potential criminal activity.
  • Screening customer wallets regularly.
  • Sharing a list of potentially blacklisted customers with other virtual asset providers and authorities.
  • Sharing Know Your Customer information with virtual asset providers and authorities.
  • The inherent challenges with the FATF travel rule are certainly very real ones. For one, it requires buy-in from many virtual asset providers running blockchain projects and exchanges using different technologies. This makes tracking customer information at a granular level more difficult. That said, the benefit of the travel rule will outweigh those challenges. It stretches beyond the typical KYC procedures most crypto service providers follow. KYC relates mostly to an organization’s internal processes. The travel rule is much broader in nature. It pushes both virtual asset providers and governments to be transparent. It aims to go beyond the idea of individual nations subscribing to their own rules surrounding crypto.

    The Ontario Securities Commission in Canada recently ruled that cryptocurrency exchange BitMEX, which operates out of the Seychelles Islands, isn’t properly registered to serve residents of the province and thus has to cease accepting new registrations and trades from Ontarians.

    More of these kinds of rulings will continue to come out of the woodwork, forcing virtual asset service providers to either adjust and comply, or take on the risks associated with doing business under the radar. The former and not the latter is the better long-term proposition for both crypto businesses and investors alike.

    There are several tools — and more are coming — that aid regulators in continuing to develop better frameworks. They allow the average consumer to feel more comfortable with getting into cryptocurrency through any number of properly vetted on-ramps.

    Most avid crypto traders are familiar with blockchain explorers — either publicly available or advanced ones being developed by private companies — that aim to dig deeper into the origins of transactions. This gives law enforcement the technology needed to track stolen funds, money laundering and criminal purchases made with crypto. The action of law enforcement adds trust to the ecosystem, making it safer for broad adoption.

    Risk-scoring solutions are also being developed that allow market participants, including exchanges and individuals, to see whether counterparty wallets or proposed transactions carry risk. This knowledge will allow exchanges to steer clear of stolen funds, money laundering and bad actors. This again adds trust to the ecosystem.

    Just in the last few days, the Conference of State Bank Supervisors, a regulatory body representing all U.S. states and territories, has announced the launch of a new regulatory framework for payment companies, money service businesses and cryptocurrency companies. Only Montana, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico are not included in the launch.

    Related: How the US and Europe are regulating crypto in 2020

    This new framework requires major payment providers like Western Union, PayPal and 76 other money services and crypto-related businesses to undergo a thorough examination of their AML practices. Altogether, this new framework will regulate payment services that are responsible for transferring over $1 trillion in customer funds annually.

    Ultimately, this launch and the broader impact of the FATF travel rule will serve to hold both businesses and market participants accountable for tracking transaction data, engaging in proper KYC protocols, and serving crypto adopters both old and new with added layers of protection that make investing in cryptocurrencies a more welcoming proposition.

    Increased regulation and law enforcement is the path leading to exponential increases in the adoption of digital assets both now and in the future. And it is inevitably coming.

    The views, thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s alone and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions of Cointelegraph.

    Mark Binns is the CEO of BIGG Digital Assets Inc. BIGG believes the future of crypto is a safe, compliant and regulated environment. He first discovered crypto in 2013 and was hooked. He believes the future of crypto is a safe, compliant and regulated environment. As the CEO of BIGG Digital Assets, Mark oversees Blockchain Intelligence Group, the maker of QLUETM and BitRank, and Netcoins.

    Source: www.bitcoindoorway.com

    Author: by admin


    Israeli Lawmakers Propose Change to Cryptocurrencies’ Legal Tax Status

    Israeli Lawmakers Propose Change to Cryptocurrencies’ Legal Tax Status

    With cryptocurrencies becoming more prominent almost by the day, several countries and financial regulators have turned their attention to providing effective regulation. In Israel, some lawmakers have proposed a new regulatory regime that could entirely transform their tax requirements and implications.

    Earlier this week, local news source Globes reported that four Israeli parliament members had proposed that the country tax cryptocurrencies like fiat currencies. Per the report, the lawmakers – Oded Forer, Yevgeny Soba, Yulia Malinovsky, and Alex Kushnir – had proposed the amendment, essentially meaning that digital assets would be taxed as currencies; not assets. 

    One major implication of this proposal is that Bitcoin will no longer be subject to capital gains taxes. The current tax law in Israel dictates that digital assets are subject to a 25 percent tax deduction whenever converted into fiat. For short-term lenders, this rate is 15 percent.

    If this new law comes into place, digital assets would be taxed significantly lower. For instance, as of 2019, people who earned less than 75,720 shekels (about $21,800) from cryptocurrencies only got taxed at a 10 percent rate. Further deductions could serve as additional incentives to hold cryptocurrencies. 

    The current tax law in the country has been in place since 2018. Per a circular from the Israeli Tax Authority (ITA), the government planned to view cryptocurrencies purely as assets. Along with the 25 percent tax rate for individuals, businesses holding or “investing” cryptocurrencies would have to remit 47 percent of their gains in taxes. 

    The law got significant pushback immediately it became mainstream. Speaking with local news source Haaretz, Shahar Strauss, a lawyer at local law firm Ziv Sharon & Company, criticized the tax authority for being out of touch with economic realities. 

    “According to the Tax Authority, investing in the esoteric currency of some Pacific island that can’t be used in Israel and many other countries meets the definition of currency and is therefore entitled to a tax exemption, while investing in the digital currency is not,” Strauss explained at the time. 

    A draft of the new proposal had similar criticisms for the ITA, explaining that cryptocurrencies would continue to grow on the back of massive adoption from tech and finance firms. Given their revolutionary prospects, the proposal would be better for the government to provide better tax regulations to incentivize investors and users.

    MK Forer also highlighted that the government needs cryptocurrencies and blockchain to bolster digital payments, particularly with a looming second coronavirus wave.  While Israeli began to ease its lockdown weeks ago, the government is seeing a resurgence in cases.

    As a result, the parliament ruled on Thursday that another lockdown should begin in the country. The Jerusalem Post reports that the new lockdown began on Friday, and it was sparked by 7,000 new cases of the virus in 24 hours. Speaking on blockchain and crypto’s potential to improve digital payments, Forer explained: 

    “It is possible to promote digital payment options due to the social distance that has been forced on us. When the economic future is unclear, we need to give growth engines a boost.”

    While the bill is quite ambitious, it would need some significant support to pass into law.

    Source: cryptomoneyteam.co

    Author: By TeamMMG


    Cryptocurrency Exchange KuCoin Hacked, More Than $150 Million Stolen In Cryptocurrencies.

    Cryptocurrency Exchange KuCoin Hacked, More Than $150 Million Stolen In Cryptocurrencies.

    Crypto exchange KuCoin on Friday September 25 announced the withdrawal of “bitcoins, ERC-20 and other tokens from the exchange’s active wallets.”

    The exchange claims that cold wallets are safe. According to Decrypt, prior to this, users complained about problems withdrawing funds.

    The KuCoin team initially reported a problem with the exchange system. At the very least, the administrator’s message on the KuCoin Telegram channel said that users should not withdraw or deposit funds on the exchange “in this situation.”

    Then large transfers were recorded from the exchange to another address: 11,484 ETH (about $4 million) and tokens for $150 million.

    Analyst firm Cryptoquant reported a significant transfer of bitcoins from KuCoin. Withdrawals stopped after this transaction.

    According to Cryptoquant CEO Ki Yong Joo, such a large withdrawal is a sure sign of an attack. If a systemic problem occurred, the exchange would close the withdrawals without such a sharp jump.

    On September 26, KuCoin CEO Johnny Liu hosted a live stream of the hack. According to Liu, the exchange team shut down the server after the first major transfer from the active wallet. However, the transfers continued as the private key was compromised. KuCoin moved the rest of its assets to new addresses.

    The exchange did not disclose the total amount of the stolen funds.

    Source: news.triunits.com

    Author: Souvik Sarkarhttps://news.triunits.comCrypto Expert And Blogger .


    Crypto hedge funds and mining regulations: Bad crypto news of the week

    Crypto hedge funds and mining regulations: Bad crypto news of the week

    It’s been a difficult week for Bitcoin this week. The price has fallen about 5 percent over the last seven days to drop beneath $10,400. It could bounce but if it continues downwards, it might drop below $10,000 and get dangerously close to the CME gap.

    One sign that the price might fall further has been a decline in the number of Bitcoin addresses holding a single Bitcoin. They’ve reached a four-month low. But Tyler Winklevoss still thinks that Bitcoin is better than gold, and  Microstrategy CEO Michael Saylor has moved from bear to bull. His company recently bought almost 16,800 Bitcoins over 74 hours, spending about $175 million. Paypal is bearish too. The payments firm is working on a way to allow merchants to accept cryptocurrencies.

    In Brazil, fund manager Hashdex has made an agreement with Nasdaq to launch the world’s first crypto asset exchange-traded fund. The fund will trade on the Bermuda Stock Exchange. And while Hashdex is deepening crypto trading, meat processing firm JBS is using the blockchain to monitor its supply chain and ensure that none of its suppliers are raising cattle on illegally deforested land.

    Australia also sees an opportunity to secure food supplies with the blockchain. The government-backed agricultural supply chain platform, Entrust, will use Hedera Hashgraph to ensure that wine from the Clare Valley region isn’t counterfeit.

    In Russia, the government has said that it will prioritize the development of blockchain technologies, while in Venezuela, the Maduro government has issued a decree to regulate crypto mining. Miners in the country now need a license.

    If you want to buy a country, or at least parts of one, a new partnership between Upland and Tilia, the makers of Second Life, lets players sell their virtual property and turn digital cash into fiat. Alternatively, you can hang around in Bakersfield. A Bitcoin Cash fan has been leaving stickers around the city with QR codes, enabling people to download gifts of up to $500 worth of the cryptocurrency. The “Bitcoin Man of Bakersfield” is trying to encourage the take-up of cryptocurrencies.

    The Bitcoin Man has already given away $1,100 and plans to give away another $2,000 but the airdrop of 28,000 MEME tokens has helped to push the price of the token up to $1,175. The giveaways were made up of batches of 250 tokens each.

    Craig Wright could have done with some of that luck this week. The Satoshi-pretender lost a plea for summary judgment and will go to trial in January in a billion-dollar Bitcoin lawsuit. And finally, Brock Pierce is hoping to do better. The former Mighty Ducks child star and Bitcoin billionaire has managed to get onto 15 states in his run for the presidency. He believes that cryptocurrency is the 21st-century cure for America’s 21st-century problems.

    Check out the audio version here:

    Joel Comm is an internet pioneer, New York Times best-selling author, futurist speaker and co-host of The Bad Crypto Podcast. That’s a fancy way of saying he writes words, says things and loves to play with cryptos.

    The views, thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s alone and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions of Cointelegraph.

    Source: www.bitcoindoorway.com

    Author: by admin


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